Journal




Discovering Carbon Steel

Years before we started Tenzo, when I was but a college boy fumbling around in the kitchen, I would spend afternoons digging up old cooking videos on the internet. Pierre Koffman, Marco Pierre White, Nico Ladenis, Michel Roux, a parade of English Francophiles or French Anglophiles who spent the ‘80s bringing French gastronomy to the British Isles. One thing I began to notice, as they seared a scallop or swirled an omelet onto a plate, were these strange pans unlike anything I had ever seen, of a strange shape, like an upside-down volcano, and a strange metal, neither copper nor stainless steel. I can’t remember the exact terms of my internet search—it must have been something like “weird european frying...

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HOME KITCHEN LOS ANGELES : MAR PEIDRO

In conjunction with Girls at Library, we're presenting a series of recipes shared by some of our favorite local LA women. First up, stylist Mar Peidro gives us her recipe for her favorite simple Catalan snack, Pa amb tomàquet.

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Artists/Makers : Rami Kim

I first knew Rami Kim as a painter.  9 years ago when I moved to Los Angeles, my friend gifted me a small print by Rami, purchased at an art fair.  The painting is of three girls in rabbit masks.  They all have medium brown hair in various stages of jumping or skipping or even flying.  There are two intersecting lines in an otherwise completely opaque black background.   And even before the gift I had seen her work in CalArts circles (I was starting, she was leaving). I loved the work because it felt tight and loose at the same time, big washes of color against perfect, precise little figures.  Often the paintings were vaguely narrative—a girl sleeping while...

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Stories: Fruits de la Mer

We launched the SS Shofu, a modest fishing vessel, in 2007 with little expertise, my father, brother, and I, thinking that because we were Japanese, fishing might come naturally to us. Since that time we have made little headway, drifting through the inlets, beaching on the shoals, and coming home at the end of the day with sunstroke, seaweed, and little else. It was a pastime that appealed, in theory, to our own ideals of rugged individualism, getting back to the basics of life, and eating well. In the rare event that we actually caught something, it was given the full Japanese treatment: killed by ikejime, cleaned with a deba knife, and often sliced thinly as sashimi with a yanagi-ba....

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